Outdated IT infrastructure-A Vulnerability

By CIOReview | Thursday, March 1, 2018
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Businesses, today, are witnessing a remarkable increase in cybercrime, from ransomware attacks to data leaks. Organizations are finding it incredibly challenging to secure outward-facing software infrastructure systems due to a number of obstacles like poor accumulation of institutional software memory and unknown software components delivered in third-party binaries. Ninety percent of the software products, these days, integrate open source code used in operating systems, network platforms, and applications. However, because of its transparency and flexibility, open source code can be better engineered than any comparable piece of proprietary code. This means that security vulnerability likely exists across a multitude of applications and platforms making open source code a low-hanging fruit for hackers to target and attack. Additionally, today’s custom enterprise software is sourced externally or contain codes from third-party vendors, which are built using open source code components. Though the codes are delivered in binary format protecting the third-party development teams’ intellectual property, it is impossible to accurately account for the entire open source components residing in them.

Every organization must make it a goal to examine all aspects of its IT. Businesses must create a list of all the data they might lose in an attack and prioritize them accordingly. Wi-fi networks should be examined to check if it is vulnerable to KRACK attack. Hardware and software systems must be updated on a regular basis. One way businesses can begin to accurately understand their existing code base is binary scanning. The binary code scanners evaluate all raw codes to identify all the different open source components and versions in the code. The results are compared to their findings in established, frequently updated databases of known security vulnerabilities. Purchasing cyber insurance is another way to mitigate security-related losses. No matter the size, businesses and organizations must start recognizing that maintaining the integrity of their current computing infrastructure is just as critical as adding new functionality and capabilities.